Tag Archives: Independent

This Week’s Campaign Ad — Ross Perot ’92

The following is an ad from the Ross Perot (I) campaign for President in 1992.  Perot finished third to then-Governor Bill Clinton (D) and the incumbent President, George HW Bush (R).  What are the highlights or lowlights of this ad? Critique it.

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This Week’s Memorabilia — John Anderson

This is a button from the John Anderson for President campaign in 1980.  Anderson was a Republican congressman from Illinois who lost to Ronald Reagan in the Republican primaries that year.  He decided to run as an Independent or in some states a National Unity, candidate.  Anderson polled very well in the Summer and early Fall of 1980, but as the campaign inched closer to November, Anderson faltered.  His campaign finished third behind Reagan and President Jimmy Carter.  Why is it difficult for Independent candidates to win the Presidency?  (None have.)

JohnAnderson

Evaluating the Ads — LePage (R) vs. Michaud (D) vs. Cutler (I)

“Evaluating the Ads” takes us to Maine where there is a three-way race for Governor.  Governor Paul LePage (R) is running for re-election against Congressman Mike Michaud (D) and attorney Eliot Cutler (I).  This race involves a rematch of sorts as LePage and Cutler vied for the same seat four years ago.

The following is an ad for Governor LePage.

What do you think the purpose is for using Democratic and Independent voters in an ad for a Republican candidate?

Here is Congressman Michaud’s ad.

What can be inferred from the ad about Governor LePage?

In the following ad for Eliot Cutler, United States Senator Angus King endorses the Independent Cutler.  King was a former Governor of Maine and is an Independent himself.

There aren’t many specifics in this ad.  Does that matter to you?

Evaluating Campaign Ads — Roberts vs. Taylor vs. Orman

There is a three person race in Kansas involving US Senator Pat Roberts (R), Shawnee County District Attorney Chad Taylor (D), and businessman Greg Orman (I).  Roberts has been United States Senator since 1997.

The above ad was run in the Republican primary, and not in the upcoming general election.  What is the purpose for such an ad?

The above ad is the first commercial for Taylor.  What is your impression of his opening ad?

Orman, as a third party candidate, is trying to demonstrate that he is different from both party candidates.  Do you believe that his ad makes the case?

The Race Has Begun?

Recently, C-Span, the cable channel devoted to covering federal government affairs, began covering the 2016 Presidential race for its Sunday evening series entitled, “Road to the White House.”  For political junkies, this could not have started soon enough.  To casual political observers, the race for the White House does not begin in 2013, but in 2016.  However, imagine yourself as a political insider for either the Democratic or Republican Parties (or for that matter, the Green Party, the Libertarian Party, or other third parties/Independents).  What would you be looking for in a candidate at this time in 2013?

Political Party Identification

The Election of 1980

The ad below was run in 1980 by the Ronald Reagan campaign for President.  Reagan, a Republican, ran against the incumbent Democrat, Jimmy Carter in the general election.  Congressman John Anderson, also a Republican, ran as a third party Independent or National Unity Party candidate in that election as well.  The man that you see in the ad is neither Reagan nor Carter.  It is not Anderson for that matter.
The speaker is then-Massachusetts Senator Ted Kennedy who ran for President in the Democratic primaries against Carter.  Kennedy attempted to capitalize on his name and his left-leaning populism against the unpopular Carter.  Kennedy’s campaign sputtered at the start and the Senator never really mounted a challenge to Carter throughout the primary season.
What Reagan’s campaign did with this ad was to use Kennedy’s words against Carter in the general election.  This is sometimes called a “them on them” ad.  It is where a candidate uses the words of his opponent’s former opponents against him.  In this case, Reagan uses the words of Kennedy against Carter.  Reagan does not have to say a word in the ad.  The goal is to get dissatisfied Democrats to switch parties on Election Day and support the Republican Reagan.
Do you believe that ads of the “them on them” variety are effective?