Tag Archives: Constitution Party

Which Party Best Understands America?

2012 Presidential Election Results (Updated)

Here are the 2012 Presidential Election Results (Popular Vote) as of Sunday, January 13, 2013.  Not all votes have been tabulated at this point.

2012 Presidential Election

Barack Obama (D) 65,899,583

Mitt Romney (R) 60,928,966

Gary Johnson (Libertarian) 1,275,821

Jill Stein (Green) 468,907

Virgil Goode (Constitution) 121,754

Roseanne Barr (Peace and Freedom) 67,436

Rocky Anderson (Justice) 43,088

Tom Hoefling (America’s) 40,624

Others:  288,664

What are your thoughts on these updated totals?

Source:  Dave Leip’s Atlas of US Presidential Elections

Do We Need Another Party?

With all the talk surrounding the “fiscal cliff” negotiations and our nation’s economy, it is hard to make sense as to where each political party stands on solving this country’s economic woes.  Democrats sound like Republicans; Republicans sound like Democrats.  It can make your head spin.  This nation was founded on a two-party system, where each party differentiated itself from the other on the issues.  When the country began, Federalists who believed in a strong, centralized government battled with Democratic-Republicans (Anti-Federalists) who believed that more power should reside in the hands of the states.  There was a clear delineation as to where each of these parties stood on the issues.  Today, many argue that there isn’t a dime’s worth of difference between the Democratic and Republican parties.  Some from that group will argue even further that the parties are not ideological enough.  Those who aruge this position believe that the Democrats should be more liberal and Republicans should be more conservative.  Do we have two moderate parties in the United States or are they more ideological then we make them out to be?  Is this the time for a third party to emerge in the United States?  If so, then what should that party look and sound like?

2012 Presidential Election Results (Updated)

Here are the 2012 Presidential Election Results (Popular Vote) as of Wednesday, November 28.  Not all votes have been tabulated at this point.

2012 Presidential Election

Barack Obama (D) 64,916,510

Mitt Romney (R) 60,493,449

Gary Johnson (Libertarian) 1,266,693

Jill Stein (Green) 459,125

Virgil Goode (Constitution) 119,364

Roseanne Barr (Peace and Freedom) 64,742

Rocky Anderson (Justice) 41,233

Tom Hoefling (America’s) 38,903

Others 225,930

There were significant increases in the vote totals since I first posted them on November 8.

What are your thoughts on these updated totals?

2012 Presidential Election Results

Here are the 2012 Presidential Election Results (Popular Vote) as of 12:09pm on Wednesday, November 7.  Included in the data are the popular vote totals from the 2008 Presidential Election.  The 2008 results are listed in parentheses.

2012 Presidential Election

Barack Obama (D) 59,725,608 (69,498,215)

Mitt Romney (R) 57,098,650 (59,948,240)

Gary Johnson (Libertarian) 1,139,562 (523,713)

Jill Stein (Green) 396,684 (161,680)

Virgil Goode (Constitution) 108,195 (199,437)

Roseanne Barr (Peace and Freedom) 48,797 (116,385)*

Rocky Anderson (Justice) 34,521 (N/A)**

Others 177,996 (323,984)

Vote totals for both the Democrats and Republicans were down from 2008. Libertarian and Green Party candidates saw an increase in their respective party’s vote totals from 2008.  The Constitution Party also saw a decrease from 2008.

*Ralph Nader ran as the Peace and Freedom Party candidate in 2008 in California and Iowa.  However, his status on many ballots was listed as “Independent”.

**The Justice Party did not run a candidate in 2008.

What are your thoughts on these totals?

Third Party Presidential Debate

Five Percent

Third party Presidential candidates face many obstacles when running for the highest office in the land.  Among those obstacles are ballot access restrictions, the public perception that they can’t win, and the lack of organizational and fundraising capabilities that could help them compete with the two major parties.  Ballot access restrictions are probably the greatest obstacle.  Each state has its own rules regarding who can and cannot get on a ballot for office.  Some states require petitions to be filed with a certain minimum of signatures.  Other states simply require a filing fee to ensure access.  For the most part, the two major parties are required to get a smaller number of signatures than their third party counterparts when gaining access to a ballot.  Ballot Access News provides a wealth of information on the difficulties that third party candidates face when running for office.

There is an upside though to third party Presidential candidacies.  Ballot access restrictions can be waived for a third party in the next Presidential election if their candidate for President this year receives 5% of the vote.  Five percent, according to the Federal Election Commission, is needed for major party recognition.  Five percent not only waives the signature requirement, but it also guarantees federal financial assistance to that third party in the next Presidential election.  This percentage may seem quite low, but recent history tells us that this threshold is quite difficult for third parties to meet.

2008

Ralph Nader (Independent) 0.56%

Bob Barr (Libertarian) 0.40%

Chuck Baldwin (Constitution) 0.15%

Cynthia McKinney (Green) 0.12%

2004

Nader (Independent) 0.38%

Michael Badnarik (Libertarian) 0.32%

Michael Peroutka (Constitution) 0.12%

David Cobb (Green) 0.10%

2000

Nader (Green) 2.73%

Pat Buchanan (Reform) 0.43%

Harry Browne (Libertarian) 0.36%

Howard Phillips (Constitution) 0.09%

John Hagelin (Natural Law) 0.08%

Source:  Dave Leip’s Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections

What are your thoughts on the five percent rule?  What information did you find on Ballot Access News that piqued your interest?