Tag Archives: Congressman

Identify the Message

Identify the political message below.  It is from a bumper sticker in 1972.  John Ashbrook was a Congressman from Ohio.  A Republican, he challenged fellow Republican and sitting President Richard Nixon in the GOP primaries.  Nixon easily defeated Ashbrook.

Ashbrook

 

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Louisiana’s Jungle Primary

In Louisiana, they have primary system that is sometimes called a “jungle primary“.  This open form of a primary allows candidates for office to run on one ballot, regardless of party affiliation.

The 1991 Louisiana Primary for Governor
Edwin Edwards (D) 33.8%
David Duke (R) 31.7%
Buddy Roemer (R) 26.5%
Clyde Holloway (R) 5.3%
Others (including R, D, and I candidates) 2.2%

Since no candidate received a simple majority, a second election was held.  Edwards defeated Duke 61-39%.  In this case, a Democrat ran against a Republican in the second round.  You could, however, end up with two candidates from the same party who run against each other in the second round.

In most other states, the conventional open and closed primary systems are used.  In each case, a nominee is chosen by the public for each party.  In open states, party affiliation is not a prerequisite for voting in either party’s primary.  In closed primary states, you can only vote in the party primary under the label you are registered.  Louisiana continues to use the “jungle primary”.  What is your opinion on the “jungle primary”?

On a side note, the Louisiana race was an intriguing one due to the candidates who ran at the time.  Edwin Edwards was an ethically challenged former Governor who lost a re-election bid to Governor Buddy Roemer.  Roemer was elected in 1987 as a Democrat but then switched his affiliation to the Republican Party midway through his term.  David Duke was a state Representative who was once the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux KlanClyde Holloway was a Congressman who, some thought, ran a spoiler candidate who could siphon off votes from Roemer.

Clip from the Past: Alben Barkley

United States Senator Alben Barkley of Kentucky died on April 30, 1956.  He was a Congressman, United States Senator, and Vice President.  After his term as VP under President Harry S. Truman ended in 1953, he ran for the Senate once again and won.  Most Presidents and Vice Presidents slowly fade away into private life.  There are exceptions, however.  John Quincy Adams became a member of the House of Representatives  in 1831 after his defeat to Andrew Jackson in 1828.  After losing a re-election bid in 1912, President William H. Taft became the Chief Justice of United States Supreme Court in 1921.

In Lexington, Virginia, at a convention, Senator Barkley’s last words were recorded.

Why do you believe it is rare to see Presidents and Vice Presidents run for or serve in other national offices (other than President)?

Evaluating the Ads — LePage (R) vs. Michaud (D) vs. Cutler (I)

“Evaluating the Ads” takes us to Maine where there is a three-way race for Governor.  Governor Paul LePage (R) is running for re-election against Congressman Mike Michaud (D) and attorney Eliot Cutler (I).  This race involves a rematch of sorts as LePage and Cutler vied for the same seat four years ago.

The following is an ad for Governor LePage.

What do you think the purpose is for using Democratic and Independent voters in an ad for a Republican candidate?

Here is Congressman Michaud’s ad.

What can be inferred from the ad about Governor LePage?

In the following ad for Eliot Cutler, United States Senator Angus King endorses the Independent Cutler.  King was a former Governor of Maine and is an Independent himself.

There aren’t many specifics in this ad.  Does that matter to you?

Evaluating the Ads — Hickenlooper vs. Beauprez

In this week’s installment of Evaluating the Ads, we’ll look at a race for Governor.  The state?  Colorado.  Governor John Hickenlooper (D) is finishing up his first term.  His opponent is former Congressman Bob Beauprez (R).  This race is a close one.

Here is Hickenlooper’s first ad from a few weeks ago.

Hickenlooper mentions that he will not run any negative ads.  Do you believe that this is a good strategy?

Here is an ad from Beauprez’s campaign:

Images matter in political ads.  What images are used in this ad and why are they used?

Evaluating Campaign Ads – Pryor vs. Cotton

In this week’s installment of “Evaluating Campaign Ads”, we’ll take a look at two ads that have been running in Arkansas.  Senator Mark Pryor (D) is up for re-election and his opponent is Congressman Tom Cotton (R).  Both ads shown below are what might be called “negative” or “contrast” ads.

The first ad is from Representative Cotton.

The following ad is from Senator Pryor.

What are your thoughts on these two ads?  What clues do you see that identify these ads as “negative” or “contrast”?