Tag Archives: Ads

Clip from the Past: McCormack for President

In 1976, a housewife from New York, Ellen McCormack ran for President.  In 18 states, her name appeared on primary election ballots as a Democrat.  Her platform was strictly based on a pro-life approach to the issue of abortion.  Even though she did not win any primaries, McCormack’s campaign was successful enough to have raised money for federal matching funds and for Secret Service protection.  The extra campaign dollars also allowed for the creation of television spots that would promote McCormack’s pro-life beliefs.

Would a commercial, such as this one, work in today’s political climate?

Offense or Defense?

This is an for Mayor Rahm Emanuel of Chicago.  Emanuel is in a runoff contest against another Democratic opponent, Jesus “Chuy” Garcia.  Some were surprised that the Mayor would be in an April runoff against the lesser known Garcia, but this is where he is.  The ad centers around Emanuel admitting that he has not always been a good listener when it comes to the needs of the people of Chicago.  What is your impression of this ad?  Is it effective?

Ad from the Past: Eisenhower for President

The first Presidential campaign to utilize television as a campaign ad medium was for Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1952.  General Eisenhower was not the most telegenic candidate, but his campaign team made it clear that they would do whatever it could to reach as many people as possible through television.  Most of Eisenhower’s ads were positive in content.  Here is one of them:

What present day campaign ad techniques are also found in the Eisenhower ad from 1952?

Who Paid For That Ad?

A common misperception from the 1988 Presidential campaign between George H.W. Bush and Michael Dukakis is that Bush team produced and ran ad that prominently featured Willie Horton.  The “Willie Horton ad” is it was to be called, featured a criminal (Horton) and how he was allowed out of prison on weekends by a Massachusetts Governor (Dukakis) in part to that state’s prison furlough program.  The ad mentions that while Horton was out on one weekend pass, he kidnapped, stabbed, and raped a woman and brutally beat that woman’s boyfriend.  The ad struck a nerve with the public, hurt the Dukakis campaign, and Dukakis never recovered.  Many who watched the ad would reference it as “Bush’s Willie Horton ad” when in fact the ad was created by the National Security PAC (Political Action Committee).  This PAC ran an ad, by federal law, independent of the Bush campaign.

How would the public know if the ad was paid for and produced by an outside or independent organization?  Sure, there was a disclaimer at the bottom of the “Horton” ad that disclosed the source.  The disclaimer was about the size of the type of disclaimers that you see in a car commercial.  A magnifying glass is a necessity for proper reading.  In the last twelve years, identifying a commercial’s source became a bit easier for the public.  With the passage of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BCRA) (2002), candidates at the federal level who run ads from their own campaign coffers must say, “I am so and so and I am approve this message.”  Most campaign commercials are run by outside organizations, so this BCRA requirement is not applicable.

What are your thoughts on the amount of ads that you have seen in the last few months?  Now that the elections are over, you perhaps can fully process what has been transmitted over the airwaves in this election season.

 

Evaluating the Ads — Begich (D) vs. Sullivan (R)

This week’s installment of Evaluating the Ads takes us to Alaska, where the polls close at a given time, but the results may take days before anyone knows of a winner.  Desolate and out of the way places can get in the way of a timely outcome.

United States Senator Mark Begich (D) is looking for a second term in Washington.  His opponent, former state Attorney General Dan Sullivan (R) has a waged spirited campaign against him.

Here are two ads that were run at the end of each campaign.

The first is from Senator Begich.

This ad is from Attorney General Sullivan.

For this week’s question, I want you to think of how negative campaigns can be.  Mudslinging is a term that we like to use in political circles.  To dirty up an opponent is almost a necessity in a campaign.  However, here are two ads that are positive and are being run at the end or near the end of each candidate’s bid for the Senate.  Do you think that it is a good strategy to end a campaign on a positive note?  Would you rather see the candidates finish on a contrast/negative ad?

Evaluating the Ads: Nunn (D) vs. Perdue (R)

In this week’s installment of Evaluating the Ads, Georgia is on our mind.  There’s an open seat for the United States Senate involving Michelle Nunn (D) and David Perdue (R).  The reason for the vacancy is due to retirement of Senator Saxby Chambliss (R).  Republicans are hoping to hold on to the seat.  Nunn is the daughter of former United States Senator Sam Nunn (D).  Perdue is a cousin of former Governor Sonny Perdue (R).

The first ad is from Perdue’s campaign.

Does a biographical ad resonate with you?

The following ad is from Nunn’s campaign.

Does an endorsement from former Senator Nunn make a difference to you?

Clip from the Past: Ellen McCormack for President

In 1976, a housewife from New York, Ellen McCormack ran for President.  In 18 states, her name appeared on primary election ballots as a Democrat.  Her platform was strictly based on a pro-life approach to the issue of abortion.  Even though she did not win any primaries, McCormack’s campaign was successful enough to have raised money for federal matching funds and for Secret Service protection.  The extra campaign dollars also allowed for the creation of television spots that would promote McCormack’s pro-life beliefs.

Would a commercial, such as this one, work in today’s political climate?