Tag Archives: 2014

Evaluating the Ads: Nunn (D) vs. Perdue (R)

In this week’s installment of Evaluating the Ads, Georgia is on our mind.  There’s an open seat for the United States Senate involving Michelle Nunn (D) and David Perdue (R).  The reason for the vacancy is due to retirement of Senator Saxby Chambliss (R).  Republicans are hoping to hold on to the seat.  Nunn is the daughter of former United States Senator Sam Nunn (D).  Perdue is a cousin of former Governor Sonny Perdue (R).

The first ad is from Perdue’s campaign.

Does a biographical ad resonate with you?

The following ad is from Nunn’s campaign.

Does an endorsement from former Senator Nunn make a difference to you?

How Have The Parties Been Doing?

Courtesy of the Center for Responsive Politics, this chart demonstrates how much money has been raised and spent by the Democratic and Republican Parties in the 2013-2014 election season (as of October 16, 2014).  Is there anything that stands out to you in this chart? Fundraising Data

Evaluating the Ads — Quinn (D) vs. Rauner (R)

In this week’s installment of “Evaluating the Ads”, we’ll take a look at two ads from the race for Governor of Illinois.  The incumbent, Democrat Pat Quinn is looking for a second full term of office.  His opponent, Republican Bruce Rauner, is trying to unseat Quinn.  In both of the ads that you are about to see, Quinn and Rauner present both a negative and a positive message in 30 seconds.

Here is Quinn’s ad.

Here is Rauner’s ad.

Which of the two ads is more effective?

Predicting the Midterms

The midterm elections are less than 30 days away.  Control of the United States Senate and House of Representatives hangs in the balance.  The Democratic Party controls the United States Senate with 53 members.  The Republican Party has 45.  There are two Independents in the Senate who caucus, or work with, the Democrats.  In order to win the Senate, the Republican Party needs a net gain of six Senate seats this November.  The current makeup of the House of Representatives favors the Republican Party as they 233 seats to the Democrats, 199.  In order for the Democrats to retake the House, they would need a net gain of 17 seats.

Evaluating the Ads — LePage (R) vs. Michaud (D) vs. Cutler (I)

“Evaluating the Ads” takes us to Maine where there is a three-way race for Governor.  Governor Paul LePage (R) is running for re-election against Congressman Mike Michaud (D) and attorney Eliot Cutler (I).  This race involves a rematch of sorts as LePage and Cutler vied for the same seat four years ago.

The following is an ad for Governor LePage.

What do you think the purpose is for using Democratic and Independent voters in an ad for a Republican candidate?

Here is Congressman Michaud’s ad.

What can be inferred from the ad about Governor LePage?

In the following ad for Eliot Cutler, United States Senator Angus King endorses the Independent Cutler.  King was a former Governor of Maine and is an Independent himself.

There aren’t many specifics in this ad.  Does that matter to you?

Midterm Voter Turnout

Voter Turnout

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Courtesy of FairVote, here are the voter turnout percentages from Presidential and non-Presidential elections beginning in 1948.  This year, 2014, is a midterm election or an election that does not include a Presidential race.  As you can see, elections in non-Presidential years have never experienced voter turnout over 50%.  The best year was 1966 at 49%.  Why do you believe that voter turnout in non-Presidential elections is so low?  What do you think the national turnout will be this year?

Evaluating the Ads — Hickenlooper vs. Beauprez

In this week’s installment of Evaluating the Ads, we’ll look at a race for Governor.  The state?  Colorado.  Governor John Hickenlooper (D) is finishing up his first term.  His opponent is former Congressman Bob Beauprez (R).  This race is a close one.

Here is Hickenlooper’s first ad from a few weeks ago.

Hickenlooper mentions that he will not run any negative ads.  Do you believe that this is a good strategy?

Here is an ad from Beauprez’s campaign:

Images matter in political ads.  What images are used in this ad and why are they used?