Can You Be Overqualified To Run For President?

Bill Richardson was the Governor of New Mexico from 2003-2011.  Before that, he was the US Secretary of Energy, the US Ambassador to the United Nations, and a member of the House of Representatives.  During his tenure as Governor, Richardson ran for the Democratic nomination for President in 2008.  Despite his credentials, Richardson finished fourth in the Iowa Caucus and fourth in the New Hampshire Primary.  Soon after, Richardson dropped his bid for the Presidency.  Then US Senator Barack Obama won the party’s nomination.  Here are two commercials from his 2008 campaign.  Can you actually be overqualified to run for President?

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62 responses to “Can You Be Overqualified To Run For President?

  1. i dont think you are overqualified, but you do need to be very high up their in order to be president. you are controling a goverment and a country is in your hands. so the quiliftcation should be high

  2. Khader Zahdan

    i think that sometimes you can be over qualified. if someone has many qualifications that exceed expectations people may begin to believe that they have a hidden agenda. however it is always better to be overqualified than to be under qualified. i would rather have a president that is more than competent and could do more for his country than an under qualified president that cant live up to expectations.

  3. “I think you’re a little overqualified for what we’re looking for?”

    Did I really just here this phrase uttered in reference to the Office of our countries Presidency?

    As an American, I’m offended. Here’s this man who has admittedly so, has quite the repetoire under his belt. He has served as governor and a few other cushy positions, but how does this experience translate to the presidency? The idea of having an overqualified president these days is also laughable, and maybe I am being too harsh here and thats the joke.

    But I feel this man is making a statement. He’s telling us that his track record has OVERQUALIFIED him for our Presidency? Oh really Bill Richardson? I’ll just leave this here then.

    “During the 2012 trial United States of America v. Carollo, Goldberg and Grimm, the former CPR employee Doug Goldberg testified that he was involved in giving Bill Richardson campaign contributions amounting to $100,000 in exchange for his company CPR being hired to handle a $400 million swap deal for the New Mexico state government.”

    Overqualified indeed.

  4. Can you be over qualified to be American President? I would say in a way. What do i mean? I mean sometimes your awesome qualifications can be so non relative to the public or the key parts of the public like women or youth, or cultured communities. For example If it was about credentials Senator McCain should have won over then Senator Obama. But it was about in some ways relatability and connection to the public, and as we have seen with President Obama if the public is intrigued by you they will give you a chance and see what you have to say on issues. I do think Mr. alex hopkins is being to harsh first every elections is a help me now i will help you later way of life. 2nd its seems politics are becoming more and more holywood which means presidency qualifications are on the decline in my opinion, and if you really think on it President Obama is probably one of are more least expirenced and least credentials presidents in america history.

  5. Mark Mou Hong

    I think sometimes a candidate can be over qualify as a president. If a candidate has accomplish many of the achievements,it will be hard for the candidate continue to achieve throughout his presidency. If someone like Richardson got elected his battle will be won too easily. The overachiever will have a feeling of he deserve the triumph he has won. The candidate will lose the sense of feeling to fulfill his obligation as president of United States of America.

  6. Maisem Nakhleh

    i think you should have a high education and know what you are getting your self into you must be strong and lead the country no matter what happens and it should be in great hands when you finish your term it is you obligation to be the best

  7. 1. Doug Pujdak | April 6, 2013 at 10:27 pm | Reply
    I would say you can definitely be overqualified to run for President. To uninformed voters, I am willing to place a wager that a majority of the uniformed has absolutely no clue what any of those positions held by Bill Richardson are, and some probably do not know they even exist. This goes unrecognized to this type of voter, which are most likely unimpressed. On the other hand, a well-informed and engaged voter would most likely be scared off by such accomplishments. I would agree with the angle that Mr. Richardson does appear to be a career politician and would tend to be thought of as out of touch with many Americans. As unfair as this may sound or as absurd as this may seem, in this particular instance, it does seem quite possible to be overqualified to run for President.

  8. Alejandro Medina

    I think it is possible to be overqualified to run for president. You can have all the right criterias to become president but if your not the people person none of those thing will do you any good in the long run. A high eduacation will always look good in any job no matter what the position is.

  9. I think you can be over qualified to run for president which would scare a lot of people. Under qualified individuals would have to stick closely with their parties just for the backing.

  10. I don’t think you can be overqualified to be president. I think if anything being overqualified is a good thing. In order to be president you should have lots of experience.

  11. There is no such thing as being overqualified for the Presidency. As the de facto leader of one of the most powerful nations as the world, there is only “barely qualified” or “woefully underqualified.” Anything less than a doctorate of economics and a 10-year military career leans more to the latter end, given the responsibilities of the position.

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